January 22nd, 2014

CDC: The uniform definition of youth bullying in schools


The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines bullying as:
• any unwanted aggressive behavior(s)
• by another youth or group of youths who are not siblings or current dating partners
• that involves an observed or perceived power imbalance and
• is repeated multiple times or is highly likely to be repeated.

Bullying may inflict harm or distress on the targeted youth including physical, psychological, social, or educational harm. A young person can be a perpetrator, a victim, or both (also known as “bully/victim”).

Bullying can occur in-person and through technology. Electronic aggression or cyber-bullying is bullying that happens through email, chat rooms, instant message, a website, text message, or social media.

In addition, the CDC remarked

School-based bullying prevention programs are widely implemented but not always evaluated. However, research suggests promising program elements include:

• Improving supervision of students

• Using school rules and behavior management techniques in the classroom and throughout the school to detect and address bullying by providing consequences for bullying

• Having a whole school anti-bullying policy, and enforcing that policy consistently

• Promoting cooperation among different professionals and between school staff and parents

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WBI offers “whole school solutions” that address both youth and adult (workplace) bullying in schools.

Consultants: Dr. Gary Namie & Dr. Matt Spencer

Speaker & WBI Business Development Director: Frank Mulcahy, 713-545-2222

<-- Read the complete WBI Blog


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This entry was posted on Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014 at 1:20 pm and is filed under Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 2. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.



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