Archive for the ‘The New America’ Category


WBI Podcast 39: American workers under the microscope

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

Hitachi technology takes worker surveillance to new extremes. Where is the employers’ confidence in, and trust of, employees? It’s called the “Business Microscope.”

Here’s a picture of the device and the tracking system:

Listen to WBI Podcast 39 by Dr. Gary Namie

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Posted in Commentary by G. Namie, Employers Gone Wild: Doing Bad Things, Podcasts, The New America, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



HS magazine tackles internal “rape culture,” censored by “adult” principal

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

Our societal tendency to blame victims of all sorts undercuts our ability to make systemic changes. If individuals are responsible rather than schools, employers and man-made (sic) organizations, then nothing ever has to change.

This is one of the many forms of resistance we face in the workplace bullying movement.

An interesting case surfaced in which a Wisconsin high school principal, Jon Wiltzius, was upset with a story published in the student’s monthly magazine. The editors bravely took on the topic of rape and blaming victims in their school. Three victims told their stories anonymously. Kudos for editors-in-chief Rachel Schneider and Tanvi Kumar.

The cover story ruffled the feathers of the principal responsible for the organizational (building) culture. His reaction — to cite case law that the District has control, not the student editors, over the publication — rather than hold an assembly to have all students discuss what may contribute to the normalization of sexual assault in high school and what his school could do about it. Oops. Guess the students are more adult about this serious topic than the principal who chooses to duck his responsibility.

Watch the WBAY-TV, ABC affiliate in Green Bay report

Read the well-written, truthful article on pages 11-16 of the student publication Cardinal Columns at Fond-du-Lac High School.

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Posted in Broadcasts: Video, TV, radio, webinars, Commentary by G. Namie, Media About Bullying, The New America, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



When victors claim victimhood: “War on the 1%”

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

Evidence mounts every week that the American “have-nots” suffer new economic indignities. In our very unequal America (please hold off on the ‘American dream for everyone’ speech), wealth becomes might. The extremely wealthiest 1% benefited from the global recession of 2008. Of the wealth accumulated since then, the 1% won 95% while the bottom 90% of Americans grew poorer.

A disgusting aspect of our new Gilded Age (term coined in the late 19th century by Mark Twain) is the shamelessness of the uber rich. A case in point — Tom Perkins, a Silicon Valley venture capitalist, is making news with provocative (read hate-filled) comments that taxation is persecution of the rich by progressive akin to Nazi persecution of the Jews and, for extra effect, voting should be the privilege earned only by those who actually pay taxes. The latest outrageous comment was made at the ostensibly “serious” and credible San Francisco Commonwealth Club event titled: War on the 1%

Really? Really? The exploiters are victims??? Sounds like the bully’s faux lament.

Matt Tiabi regularly reports on new financial scams that generate obscene gobs of cash for the inventors while screwing employees of affected companies, and of course, the public.

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Join ‘Today We Fight Back’ against unwarranted surveillance

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

Join supporters of privacy and internet openness. See the 13 Principles on the Application of Human Rights to Communications Surveillance: including legality, necessity, proportionality, transparency and public oversight.

Call or e-mail your legislators easily from the campaign’s website.

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Americans take to the streets (finally) for justice

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

They came by the hundred thousands. You might think this is about the 750,000 Seattle Seahawks fans clogging the streets of Seattle to greet their NFL team coming home triumphant from the Super Bowl (pictured on the left). In a way, they make the point for me that it took the NFL to get people to take to the streets. But it was a feel-good parade that few could argue with. And note that the parade’s participants outnumbered the population of Seattle. Some converged on the city from far away. WBI lives 100 miles north and there were two busloads and untold car pools who made the trek. So this is what it takes to move people to act, to stand in the frigid air to make a statement of some sort.

Why don’t Americans protest in the streets? Robert Reich wrote that despite the economic pain suffered by the poor — underpaid workers, the underemployed and the unemployed — we Americans are afraid to protest corporate greed and government indifference lest we lose our jobs. He also believes that our cynicism about government, now commonplace thanks to an unrelenting message from the right for over 40 years, keeps us in our couches.

But hope springs eternal. A bit of background. North Carolina is one of several states where rabid right wingers (don’t call ‘em conservatives) control the state legislature and the governor’s seat. The politicians who seem to hate citizens have run amok, trampling voting rights, undermining public education and seemingly re-segregating the state as was done after the Civil War (or War of Northern Aggression) via Jim Crow laws. Bill Moyers produced a mini-documentary on the recent setbacks for North Carolinians.

In N.C., Rev. William Barber, pastor, PhD in public policy, State NAACP President, and organizer extraordinaire, has led what he called “Moral Monday” protests. They began with a half dozen people at his church. Barber, the smart organizer staged an event on Feb. 8 in Raleigh (see poster) that included activists for multiple progressive causes. In fact, the event had a 14-point agenda. On Sunday, the crowd estimated at between 80,000 and 100,000 marchers took over Raleigh.

Moral marchers modeled for other Americans one week after the Super Bowl that other things matter beside the NFL: quality public schools, livable wage, health care for all, increased access to voting, affordable housing, end of the death penalty, immigrant rights, and redress for North Carolina’s racist past. It was heartening to see the successful event. It should remind us of our rebellious history, that our nation was forged by protest. Too bad the corporate media kinda ignored it all.

WBI salutes the Moral Monday movement in North Carolina and around the nation.

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1:12 vote to cap “fat cat” CEO salaries in Switzerland

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

In Switzerland, the ratio of CEO pay to lowest paid workers in their companies has grown today to 43:1 from 6:1 in 1984. By comparison, in the U.S. in 2012, the ratio was 354:1, according to the AFL-CIO,. It is 84:1 in the U.K. The inequality sparked outrage and a movement in response that is sweeping Spain, France, Germany, and the EU which is considering limiting the ratio.

Why not in America?

(more…)

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“Neanderthals” in the NFL and among all managers face extinction

Tuesday, November 12th, 2013

Our human ancestors, the Neanderthals, last walked the earth 28,000 years ago. (Sorry, creationists.) To be a “neanderthal” means to lag behind modern practices, to cling onto outdated ways. (Sorry, neanderthals who were more sophisticated than the namesake.)

It’s getting harder to find apologists among the sports cognoscenti at ESPN to defend the Miami Dolphins designated bully Richie Incognito. The Miami Dolphins post-game panel after Monday Night Football on Nov. 11 stated unanimously that the locker room culture in every team would have to change just as surely as approaches to concussions have changed. They spoke of “neanderthals” in the locker room growing extinct. That the league has to evolve because other workplaces don’t behave abusively. (Oops. Yes they do. That’s the message about workplace bullying.)

We at WBI concur heartily that the NFL must evolve. How strong will be the blowback against such humanizing proposals? NFL Coach Pete Carroll spoke of preserving rituals (such as rookies carrying helmets off the field) but not hazing. Can the NFL remain as attractive to American fans without the ancillary abuse that has little to do with the game itself? Is the game so violent that it makes it difficult, if not impossible, for fired-up players to not engage in some form of abuse after the play, in the locker room, in bars after games, or at home? Are NFL players as conditioned to be violent as military veterans who have difficulty leaving a war zone to return to civilian life?

Let’s watch and hope for the evolution out of neanderthalism. Then, the NFL will be a safe place for players like Jonathan Martin who eschew off-field violence.

An evolution will require acquiring skills, both for managers in sports and in the non-sports workplace.

(more…)

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Posted in Commentary by G. Namie, NFL: Jonathan Martin, The New America, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Football insiders value the bully, claiming uniqueness of NFL workplace

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

What have the fans spawned in our lust for football in the U.S.? Is it healthy? Is it sustainable? Where is the room for the Jonathan Martins in that world?

Follow the full story in the Category list in the sidebar: NFL: Jonathan Martin

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Posted in Broadcasts: Video, TV, radio, webinars, Commentary by G. Namie, Media About Bullying, NFL: Jonathan Martin, The New America | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



If bullying can happen to Jonathan Martin at his NFL workplace …

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

Then bullying could happen to you.

Jonathan Martin, Stanford graduate, Miami Dolphins offensive lineman, walked away from a multi=million dollar contract on Monday Oct. 28 complaining about the abusive conduct of veteran teammate Richie Incognito.

Bullying triggers lots of personal shame when it continues as long as Martin’s mistreatment lasted — 1.5 years. No single incident probably sounded outrageous to Martin’s teammates — it was “just locker room banter” — nor to Martin. But the cumulative effect on him was not good, and he reached a breaking point.

The 24 year old Jonathan did what no other NFL player has ever done. It took courage in the face of player taunts and coaches’ statement. He was branded as weak, dealing with “emotional issues.”

The most remarkable aspect of his action was to show all the 54 million Americans who have directly experienced workplace bullying that they, too, should break through the silence and shame and out their bullies.

Bullying is never invited by the recipients of the torment. Though they sometimes appear to “play along,” they loathe the humiliation and degradation.

Bullied targets, you are not alone. And a big guy just made it clear that it can happen in the least likely places to the most physically able people among us. Jonathan is one of you, one of us.

Thank you Jonathan.

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Posted in Commentary by G. Namie, NFL: Jonathan Martin, The New America, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Workplace bullying in the NFL, a violent industry

Monday, November 4th, 2013

American professional football is now recognized as a violent game, not only by critics, but by its own admission. The NFL (the team owners) settled a huge lawsuit for players who suffered concussions and committed funds to researching the effects of the sport on retired players’ health. The fact that retired players chose to die by suicide, a decision driven in large part by the brain damage they suffered, speaks volumes about the sport.

Players privileged to play at the professional level have groomed their playing skills from childhood through high school and college and endured years of boys’ locker room antics where social skills are honed. It’s possibly the most masculine, aggressive environment of all workplaces (military as an equal). Do we expect respect to be part of that cutthroat competitive environment?

(more…)

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Posted in Commentary by G. Namie, Employers Gone Wild: Doing Bad Things, NFL: Jonathan Martin, The New America, Unions | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



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