Archive for the ‘Media About Bullying’ Category


PTSD sufferers: Be smart consumers of prolonged exposure therapy

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

After PTSD, More Trauma
By David J. Morris, New York Times, Jan. 17, 2015

David J. Morris, a former Marine infantry officer, is the author of the forthcoming book The Evil Hours: A Biography of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

WBI: In an ongoing search for answers for trauma sufferers, many of whom are part of the bullied target population, we re-post this essay.

Going in for therapy at a Veterans Affairs hospital is a lot like arriving at a large airport in a foreign country. You pass through a maze of confusing signage. Your documents are scrutinized. There are long lines you must stand in and a series of bureaucratic rituals that must be endured before anything resembling a human encounter occurs.

In April 2013, after doing a series of intake interviews and sitting on a waiting list for three months, I had my first human encounter with my assigned therapist at the big V.A. hospital in San Diego. Little did I know that the delay in treatment would be less agonizing than the treatment itself.

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Bullied mature university student tells her tale

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

Bullying Doesn’t Stop When You Leave School
By Sarah Ivens, Daily Mail (UK), Jan. 17, 2015

Journalist and mother Sarah Ivens endured months of spirit-crushing bullying as a mature university student. Here she explains what happened when she finally gained the courage to stand up to her tormentor.

Tears stung my eyes and my face burned red-hot with humiliation and fear. Don’t cry, don’t cry, I urged myself, as my tormentor continued to mock me in front of the entire class: ‘I mean, what a stupid thing to say!’ She glared at me disdainfully. ‘Does anyone have anything to say that is worth listening to? She clearly doesn’t!’

My fellow students giggled and regarded me mockingly. I tugged at my ponytail so that my hair fell loosely around my shoulders, shielding my crumpled expression from their gaze.

The scene did not take place at school: I wasn’t a naughty child in the playground or a rebellious teen whose teacher had finally had enough. I was 37 years old, a mother of one and had enrolled at university to do a master’s in literature where my female professor had been making my life hell for three months. I felt worn out and pathetic.

As an adult, you think you’re done with these emotions. But bullying doesn’t always stop when you pick up your GCSE results. In the workplace, within families and even among tight friendship circles, many women are victims of mean-spirited, vicious tormentors – often other women – who make their lives hell.

A 2014 survey in the US by the Workplace Bullying Institute showed that 20 per cent of people feel they have been bullied in their adult life, and that women bullies choose female targets 68 per cent of the time.

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Debunking a Puritanical myth that what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger

Monday, January 5th, 2015

What doesn’t kill you doesn’t necessarily make you stronger
By Virgie Townsend, Washington Post, Jan. 2, 2015

WBI: In this frank and personally revealing essay, the author effectively counters the notion that all traumatic early experiences in life contribute to the construction of a stronger adult character. It’s noteworthy that 44% of bullied targets admit experiencing prior familial abuse in their lives before their workplace experiences with abuse (WBI IP 2013-H).

When I was 15, I attended a writing workshop with a girl who had been sexually abused by a family member, trauma that she explored in her poetry. She said she was offended when people told her: “I’m really sorry that happened to you.” She felt like they were saying they wanted to change her, so she’d reply: “Don’t be. It made me who I am today.”

I also grew up with violence, terrified of a parent who was verbally and physically abusive, and drove drunk with me and my siblings in the backseat. Sometimes this parent would threaten to choke me with a dog collar or would fire off shotgun rounds overhead for the fun of seeing the rest of the family cower. I am glad my classmate found a way to cope with her past, but I can’t be grateful for mine.

I would have been better off without that dog collar, without those years of fear. After such episodes, I was so exhausted that I couldn’t concentrate on my homework. I repeatedly failed state math exams. My immune system was weak. As a child, I had frequent, unexplained fevers, which baffled my pediatrician and led him to test me for cancer.

It was difficult for me to make friends because of the pressure I felt to keep my home life a secret. Between the abuse and my innate shyness, I mostly avoided other kids, which was easy because I was home-schooled until ninth grade. I tried to stay quiet around my peers; I didn’t want to draw attention. And I constantly second-guessed how I acted around them, afraid that I might disgust or anger others, too.

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Posted in Bullying & Health, Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, Related Phenomena, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Univ of Minnesota: Graduate student bullying

Tuesday, November 25th, 2014

Grad and Professional Student Bullying Rises
By Christopher Aadland, Minnesota Daily, November 24, 2014

University of Minnesota surveys show peer-to-peer and faculty-to-student bullying has risen since 2007.

From verbal attacks to threats, graduate and professional students are increasingly experiencing harassment and bullying at the University of Minnesota, according to surveys.

“… I’ve lost all desire for research because of the continual harassment and hostile environment I’ve experienced,” an anonymous student said in a recent survey. “I never thought I would give up on research, but I guess anything’s possible. I’ve given up.”

For the past decade, Jan Morse, director of the University of Minnesota’s Student Conflict Resolution Center, has noticed an upsurge in graduate and professional students coming to her office looking for relief from bullies.

And despite work over the last six years by a group of school administrators, faculty members and students that aims to tackle bullying, this year’s survey still shows graduate and professional students are increasingly experiencing harassment.

(more…)

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KYW-TV Philly: Women vs. women at work

Monday, November 10th, 2014

A Nov. 7 KYW-TV, Philadelphia, segment on women bullying other women at work. Cites our 2014 WBI U.S. Workplace Bullying Survey. Several women provide good examples. Nice job on the topic by co-anchor Jessica Dean.

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Posted in Broadcasts: Video, TV, radio, webinars, Media About Bullying, WBI Education, WBI in the News, WBI Surveys & Studies | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



NYDN: When women bully women

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

When Women Bully Women
Even with a record number of women in the workforce, the glass ceiling is not budging.
BY Katrin Park, New York Daily News, November 3, 2014

I have had my share of egomaniacal male bosses, but I also know how female fury can strike.

Some years ago, I was working for the director of a UN agency — when an email landed in my boss’s inbox: “I just hate that Katrin Park.” It was, ironically, from a gender adviser, who didn’t know I managed my boss’ email.

The hostility was shocking. My boss wasn’t exactly invested in empowering her staff, either.

And so, I more than understand the 39% of women who, according to a Gallup poll, prefer a male boss over a female one (just one-quarter of women said they preferred the latter). Woman-on-woman bullying is not a simple case of disappointment, in which we look for and fail to find workplace sisterhood.

It’s as serious, if not as visible, as the wage gap in the battlefield to end inequity. As is the case with all workplace bullying, it’s discrimination and a major contributor to lost productivity.

A study this year (2014) by the Workplace Bullying Institute, an advocacy group, found that 30% of office bullies were women — and they targeted other women more than two-thirds of the time.

(more…)

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Posted in Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, WBI in the News | 2 Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



U-T: About California’s new law to train supervisors about abusive conduct

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

State to Workplace Bullies: Knock It Off
By Jonathan Horn, San Diego Union-Tribune, Nov. 2, 2014

When Stephen Cruz got a new supervisor a few years ago, his staff job at UC San Diego became something of a living hell.

The new boss would repeatedly yell at workers, scold them behind closed doors, tower above them at their desks, get visibly agitated and red in the face, and send out harsh emails when something went wrong. The emails didn’t include foul language but called out workers with phrases like “I told you,” or “I gave you a direct order,” evidence of what Cruz called extreme micromanagement.

“It may have been stylistic, but it was unacceptable,” said Cruz, who works on the medical school campus. “Yes, we need supervisors. Yes, we need managers. But we’re not at each other’s throats. We’re there to work on the mission of the university.”

Cruz, 46, said he considered the supervisor’s conduct — which improved after university and union involvement — to be abusive.

A state law taking effect Jan. 1 hopes to curb that behavior at the start. The legislation, authored by Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, requires that employers in California with 50 or more workers include lessons on anti-workplace bullying when they carry out state-mandated sexual harassment training for supervisors every two years.

(more…)

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Posted in Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, WBI in the News, Workplace Bullying Laws | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



W&J Change Agents: Improving the workplace by educating

Monday, October 27th, 2014

Kind words of recognition for me and Dr. Ruth from my undergraduate alma mater, Washington & Jefferson College, published in Change Agents The remarkable ways alumni are making the world a better place, Fall 2014.

Read the article if you wish

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Fast Company: Why Bullies Get Promoted

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

Why The Office Bully Is Getting Promoted
Your company culture may encourage bullies and you may not even know it.
By Lisa Evans, Fast Company, October 23, 2014

You may have thought you’d escaped bullying when you traded the school yard for the office, but according to the Workplace Bullying Institute, 27% of Americans are still experiencing bullying in the workplace.

Instead of being shoved in a locker or having your head dunked in the toilet, workplace bullying is non-physical, yet still as emotionally harmful. The Workplace Bullying Institute defines workplace bullying as any form of verbal abuse, job sabotage, intimidation, or humiliation.

(more…)

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Posted in Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI in the News | 1 Archived Comment | Post A Comment () »



Wisconsin county joins Freedom from Workplace Bullies Week

Friday, October 17th, 2014

County Declares No Tolerance for Workplace Bullying
By Lyn Jerde, Portage (WI) Daily Register, Oct. 16, 2014

Andy Ross made it clear at the outset: Nobody is saying that there are bullies working for Columbia County.

But, in urging the County Board Wednesday to approve a resolution proclaiming Freedom from Workplace Bullies Week, Ross said the county’s top governing body should reiterate the importance of a bully-free workplace.

Ross is a member of the County Board’s Human Resources Committee, which offered the resolution, which the County Board approved unanimously.

The Workplace Bullying Institute, based in Bellingham, Washington, started largely because one of the founders, Ruth Namie, once had a “boss from hell,” according to information on the Workplace Bullying Institute’s website. In the 1990s, she wrote, there was little legal recourse for victims of workplace harassment if the harassment wasn’t overtly racist or sexist.

The Institute has declared next week, Oct. 19 to 25, as Freedom from Workplace Bullies Week.

The Institute defines workplace bullying as “a systematic campaign of interpersonal destruction that jeopardizes your health, your career, the job you once loved.” This kind of bullying usually doesn’t entail physical threats, but rather deliberate emotional and psychological abuse.

Ross told the County Board that the resolution puts the county on record that such behavior won’t be tolerated in any Columbia County department.

“This is one of those topics that we wish we didn’t have to address,” he said.

The topic is being addressed, Ross noted, in ongoing management and leadership training that has been provided, first to county department heads and later to lower-level managers in county departments. The training, offered through Madison Area Technical College, will focus this fall on how managers can avoid bullying behavior.

“Depending on how old you are,” Ross said, “it may be something that was acceptable, and pretty common, years ago. But we can’t tolerate it anymore.”

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Posted in Freedom Week, Good News, Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, WBI Education, WBI in the News | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



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