Archive for the ‘Print: News, Blogs, Magazines’ Category


Univ of Minnesota: Graduate student bullying

Tuesday, November 25th, 2014

Grad and Professional Student Bullying Rises
By Christopher Aadland, Minnesota Daily, November 24, 2014

University of Minnesota surveys show peer-to-peer and faculty-to-student bullying has risen since 2007.

From verbal attacks to threats, graduate and professional students are increasingly experiencing harassment and bullying at the University of Minnesota, according to surveys.

“… I’ve lost all desire for research because of the continual harassment and hostile environment I’ve experienced,” an anonymous student said in a recent survey. “I never thought I would give up on research, but I guess anything’s possible. I’ve given up.”

For the past decade, Jan Morse, director of the University of Minnesota’s Student Conflict Resolution Center, has noticed an upsurge in graduate and professional students coming to her office looking for relief from bullies.

And despite work over the last six years by a group of school administrators, faculty members and students that aims to tackle bullying, this year’s survey still shows graduate and professional students are increasingly experiencing harassment.

(more…)

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NYDN: When women bully women

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

When Women Bully Women
Even with a record number of women in the workforce, the glass ceiling is not budging.
BY Katrin Park, New York Daily News, November 3, 2014

I have had my share of egomaniacal male bosses, but I also know how female fury can strike.

Some years ago, I was working for the director of a UN agency — when an email landed in my boss’s inbox: “I just hate that Katrin Park.” It was, ironically, from a gender adviser, who didn’t know I managed my boss’ email.

The hostility was shocking. My boss wasn’t exactly invested in empowering her staff, either.

And so, I more than understand the 39% of women who, according to a Gallup poll, prefer a male boss over a female one (just one-quarter of women said they preferred the latter). Woman-on-woman bullying is not a simple case of disappointment, in which we look for and fail to find workplace sisterhood.

It’s as serious, if not as visible, as the wage gap in the battlefield to end inequity. As is the case with all workplace bullying, it’s discrimination and a major contributor to lost productivity.

A study this year (2014) by the Workplace Bullying Institute, an advocacy group, found that 30% of office bullies were women — and they targeted other women more than two-thirds of the time.

(more…)

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Posted in Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, WBI in the News | 2 Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



U-T: About California’s new law to train supervisors about abusive conduct

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

State to Workplace Bullies: Knock It Off
By Jonathan Horn, San Diego Union-Tribune, Nov. 2, 2014

When Stephen Cruz got a new supervisor a few years ago, his staff job at UC San Diego became something of a living hell.

The new boss would repeatedly yell at workers, scold them behind closed doors, tower above them at their desks, get visibly agitated and red in the face, and send out harsh emails when something went wrong. The emails didn’t include foul language but called out workers with phrases like “I told you,” or “I gave you a direct order,” evidence of what Cruz called extreme micromanagement.

“It may have been stylistic, but it was unacceptable,” said Cruz, who works on the medical school campus. “Yes, we need supervisors. Yes, we need managers. But we’re not at each other’s throats. We’re there to work on the mission of the university.”

Cruz, 46, said he considered the supervisor’s conduct — which improved after university and union involvement — to be abusive.

A state law taking effect Jan. 1 hopes to curb that behavior at the start. The legislation, authored by Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, requires that employers in California with 50 or more workers include lessons on anti-workplace bullying when they carry out state-mandated sexual harassment training for supervisors every two years.

(more…)

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Posted in Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, WBI in the News, Workplace Bullying Laws | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



W&J Change Agents: Improving the workplace by educating

Monday, October 27th, 2014

Kind words of recognition for me and Dr. Ruth from my undergraduate alma mater, Washington & Jefferson College, published in Change Agents The remarkable ways alumni are making the world a better place, Fall 2014.

Read the article if you wish

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Fast Company: Why Bullies Get Promoted

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

Why The Office Bully Is Getting Promoted
Your company culture may encourage bullies and you may not even know it.
By Lisa Evans, Fast Company, October 23, 2014

You may have thought you’d escaped bullying when you traded the school yard for the office, but according to the Workplace Bullying Institute, 27% of Americans are still experiencing bullying in the workplace.

Instead of being shoved in a locker or having your head dunked in the toilet, workplace bullying is non-physical, yet still as emotionally harmful. The Workplace Bullying Institute defines workplace bullying as any form of verbal abuse, job sabotage, intimidation, or humiliation.

(more…)

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Wisconsin county joins Freedom from Workplace Bullies Week

Friday, October 17th, 2014

County Declares No Tolerance for Workplace Bullying
By Lyn Jerde, Portage (WI) Daily Register, Oct. 16, 2014

Andy Ross made it clear at the outset: Nobody is saying that there are bullies working for Columbia County.

But, in urging the County Board Wednesday to approve a resolution proclaiming Freedom from Workplace Bullies Week, Ross said the county’s top governing body should reiterate the importance of a bully-free workplace.

Ross is a member of the County Board’s Human Resources Committee, which offered the resolution, which the County Board approved unanimously.

The Workplace Bullying Institute, based in Bellingham, Washington, started largely because one of the founders, Ruth Namie, once had a “boss from hell,” according to information on the Workplace Bullying Institute’s website. In the 1990s, she wrote, there was little legal recourse for victims of workplace harassment if the harassment wasn’t overtly racist or sexist.

The Institute has declared next week, Oct. 19 to 25, as Freedom from Workplace Bullies Week.

The Institute defines workplace bullying as “a systematic campaign of interpersonal destruction that jeopardizes your health, your career, the job you once loved.” This kind of bullying usually doesn’t entail physical threats, but rather deliberate emotional and psychological abuse.

Ross told the County Board that the resolution puts the county on record that such behavior won’t be tolerated in any Columbia County department.

“This is one of those topics that we wish we didn’t have to address,” he said.

The topic is being addressed, Ross noted, in ongoing management and leadership training that has been provided, first to county department heads and later to lower-level managers in county departments. The training, offered through Madison Area Technical College, will focus this fall on how managers can avoid bullying behavior.

“Depending on how old you are,” Ross said, “it may be something that was acceptable, and pretty common, years ago. But we can’t tolerate it anymore.”

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Posted in Freedom Week, Good News, Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, WBI Education, WBI in the News | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



HBR: How to Deal with a Mean Colleague

Friday, October 17th, 2014

By Amy Gallo, Harvard Business Review, October 16, 2014

When a colleague is mean to you, it can be hard to know how to respond. Some people are tempted to let aggressive behavior slide in the hopes that the person will stop. Others find themselves fighting back. When you’re being treated poorly by a coworker how can you change the dynamic? And if the behavior persists or worsens, how do you know when you’re dealing with a true bully?

What the Experts Say


“When it comes to bad behavior at work, there’s a broad spectrum,” with outright bullies on one end and people who are simply rude on the other, says Michele Woodward, an executive coach and host of HBR’s recent webinar: “Bullies, Jerks, and Other Annoyances” You may not know which end of the spectrum you’re dealing with until you actually address the behavior. If it’s a bully, it can be difficult ­— if not impossible — to get the person to change, says Gary Namie, the founder of the Workplace Bullying Institute and author of The Bully at Work. But in most cases, you can ­— and should ­— take action. “Know that you have a solution, you’re not powerless,” says Woodward. Here are some tactics to consider when dealing with an aggressive colleague.
(more…)

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Posted in Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education, WBI in the News | 1 Archived Comment | Post A Comment () »



“It’s On Us” Anti-Sex Assault Program Blames Bystanders

Saturday, September 27th, 2014

There is a raging epidemic of sexual assaults on US college campuses. Reliable estimates claim that between 16% and 25% of college women face the risk of rape or some other assault, according to the spring 2014 report by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. The Obama Administration’s goal is to understand the problem then propose legislative, behavioral and institutional changes to eradicate the problem.

On Sept. 23, 2014, the government launched a new public education campaign featuring celebrities (ostensibly the only credible Americans with the right to suggest that the public change its behavior) — It’s On Us. The message attempts to increase the responsibility felt by witnesses of assaults to intervene and disrupt.

In school bullying initiatives, it’s called making “upstanders” out of bystanders. Witnesses are known to not intervene in emergencies of all kinds. The reluctance is called the “bystander effect,” and followed a 1964 rape and murder of Kitty Genovese in Queens New York witnessed by 38 neighbors, each of whom failed to call the police in time to save her life. The explanations that emerged from subsequent research (led by social psychologists John Darley and Bibb Latane starting in the 1960’s). Bystander reticence is usually based on fear — of retaliation, of botching a rescue, of being the sole helper, of being the next victim.

(more…)

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Posted in Fairness & Social Justice Denied, Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | 1 Archived Comment | Post A Comment () »



Black Enterprise: 4 Signs of Workplace Bullying: What You Can Do

Friday, September 19th, 2014

by Karima Mariama-Arthur, Esq., Black Enterprise, Sept. 1, 2014

If you thought bullying was over after elementary school, think again. No longer confined to boundaries of the schoolyard, the new face of bullying is far more sophisticated and adult! Workplace bullying is a growing epidemic that has prompted numerous groups to press Congress on legislation that would outlaw it. With more than one-third of the U.S. workforce being bullied, it’s a shocking truth deserving of significantly more exposure. The Boston Globe discussed the topic late last month, shedding light on what has become the workplace’s “dirty little secret.”

(more…)

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Entrepreneur: Bosses Who Pick on One Employee Ruin Everyone’s Productivity, Study Shows

Saturday, September 6th, 2014

By Laura Entis – Entrepreneur – Sep. 4, 2014

You shouldn’t call people names. You shouldn’t yell, or belittle others. These are lessons we’re supposed to learn as children, but unfortunately, such behaviors persist long after we’ve left the playground: Workplace bullying is sadly commonplace.

It doesn’t just take place among coworkers. A common tick of the Bad Boss is to select an office scapegoat on whom he or she can dump any built up frustration/anger/aggression at whim.

It makes sense that direct targets of their bosses’ abuse would experience a decrease in productivity; if your boss is frequently yelling at you, your work will likely suffer.

But a new study from a team of researchers at Michigan State University found that when a boss frequently bullies one employee, the entire team’s productivity decreases. The study involved looking at verbal abuse and demeaning emails in a controlled lab setting.

“That’s the most disturbing finding,” lead investigator Crystal Farh said in a press release, “because it’s not just about individual victims now, it’s about creating a context where everybody suffers, regardless of whether you were individually abused or not.”

According to her research, while targeted individuals contributed less (as one would expect), their team members “descended into conflicts” and also, on average, were less productive.

Farh’s main takeaway? In the wake of any situation where a boss is bullying an underling, everyone on the team – not just that employee – will need help repairing interpersonal relationships and rebuilding trust. In other words, bullying bosses are truly toxic because their bad behavior spreads, infecting the entire office.

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