Archive for the ‘Tutorials About Bullying’ Category


Santa Clara Sports Law & Ethics Symposium and the NFL

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

WBI proudly participated in the Fifth Annual Sports Law and Ethics Symposium at Santa Clara University on Sept. 11 hosted by the Institute of Sports Law and Ethics. Planning for the event preceded the NFL inadequate handling of the multiple domestic violence incidents by player-employees. But the symposium was immersed in the headlines of the day.

Gary Namie, WBI Director, joined a panel exploring Bullying and the Locker Room Culture. My contribution was to educate the audience about adult bullying in the workplace and overlap with the Jonathan Martin/NFL case. Esteemed colleagues on the panel included

Brandi Chastain, U.S. Olympic and World Cup women’s soccer champion turned advocate for youth safety in soccer

William Pollack, PhD, Harvard Medical School clinical psychologist and author of Real Boys: Rescuing Our Sons from the Myths of Boyhood

• Jim Thompson, founder of the Positive Coaching Alliance an organization dedicated to transforming all youth sports into positive, character-building experiences

Paraag Marathe, President of the 49ers of the NFL opened the Symposium. He refused to address the then-current domestic abuser Ray McDonald presented for the team. I was able to ask if the integrity and character of players was part of the recruitment and hiring process. He emphatically said that players with skills but no integrity had a place on the 49ers roster. He also cited the extensive psychological testing that all potential player-employees face. Hmm.

KPIX-TV San Francisco coverage of the Symposium

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Posted in Employers Gone Wild: Doing Bad Things, NFL: Jonathan Martin, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education, WBI in the News | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Forbes: Can Boomers Stop The Bullying At Work?

Wednesday, August 27th, 2014

By Nancy Collamer, Forbes, August 25, 2014

If you saw a young child being pushed around on the playground, chances are you would intervene. But are you equally proactive when you see bullying at work?

While this may sound like a hypothetical question, it’s anything but. According to a 2014 survey conducted by the Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI), 27% of Americans have been bullied at work, 21% have witnessed it and 72% of us are aware that workplace bullying happens.

Real bullying involves more than just bad management and obnoxious behavior.

How Bullying Can Harm A Victim’s Health

It also means health-harming behaviors that can include verbal abuse, offensive conduct and intentional sabotage. And workplace bullying doesn’t just harm the victim. It leads to poor morale, high turnover and low productivity, which impact the entire organization.

The problem is now so widespread that lawmakers in 15 states have introduced legislation aimed at prodding employers to take the matter seriously or face consequences.

Why Boomers Can Be Effective

So what are you willing to do about it? I ask because many boomers are in management and as a result, some are in a good position to take action. Even if you’re not among your employer’s leadership team, you still might be able to make a difference.

If you’re well respected by colleagues, have good relations with key influencers at your employer or have strong job security, it’s likely easier for you to speak up and get management to take bullying seriously than it is for your younger co-workers.

That is an important advantage. Just like on the playground where bigger kids target weaker ones, the majority of workplace bullying is inflicted from the top down. According to the WBI survey, 56% of it is attributed to bosses, compared to 33% that’s blamed on peers. Given this inherent power imbalance, it’s no surprise that few victims stand up to their abusers.

I want to emphasize that not every boomer is in a position to stand up to workplace bullies.

Many older workers are in precarious job situations and know that if they speak up, they could be fired. That’s especially true in environments where bully behavior is a celebrated part of the workplace culture. (Wolves of Wall Street anyone?)

(more…)

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Rare twist: Employees loyal to ousted CEO protest and boycott

Sunday, July 27th, 2014

A grocery store chain, DeMoulas Market Basket, started in 1916 in Lowell, Massachusetts by two Greek immigrants is at the center of a rare remarkable demonstration of employee and customer loyalty.

The original Market Basket founders sold their store to two sons, brothers Mike and George, in 1954. When George died, a blood feud began, claiming (and a 1994 court agreeing) that Mike had cheated George and his family out of $500 million. George’s son, Arthur S. Demoulas, still became Boston’s 8th wealthiest person.

Arthur T. Demoulas, Mike’s son and the cousin of Arthur S., was named CEO in 2008 by the Market Basket Board of Directors controlled by Arthur S. (History from the Demoulas corporate website. More history from a Boston Globe video.)

The the all male board, led by Arthur S. attempted to fire Arthur T. in 2013, and eventually did fire him on June 23, 2014. Two other executives were fired and six quit.

As CEO, Arthur T. was committed to the firm’s 25,000 employees like few American CEOs. Said the Boston Globe about him:

It’s easy to see why the employees love Arthur T., who has been generous to them to a degree that drives his relatives crazy. One of the acts that drew their ire was replacing $46 million that their profit-sharing plan lost in the market during the 2008 financial meltdown. Arthur T. thought it was money the employees were entitled to. His cousins argued, not unreasonably, that investments sometimes go sour.

The Market Basket melodrama exploded outside the board room when loyal employees and customers took to the streets to protest and to gather signatures on petitions to re-instate Arthur T.

Here’s the account from WMUR-TV:

(more…)

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A dedicated educator passes — Vernetta Rosemary Northcutt

Monday, July 14th, 2014

Vernetta Rosemary Northcutt (1945 – 2014)

At South Sacramento Hospital beloved mother and educator Vernetta Rosemary Northcutt passed early evening on June 3, after a valiant two plus year battle against pancreatic cancer. Her son Will and oldest nephew Robert whom loved her dearly, were with her throughout her final hours.

She moved to Elk Grove eight years ago after living in Vallejo, where she was known and respected for over 20 years as a teacher in the VUSD, spending the vast majority of her 25 plus year educational career with the VUSD as a Vallejo High School teacher. Loved and appreciated by a great number of her students, Ms. Northcutt was well known for her devotion to teaching students to reach beyond their potential and be all that they could be using well developed educational tools and creative methods.

She also fought to reclaim the dignity denied her by that same school district. Read the story of her travails here.

A memorial for her past students and close friends will be held on July 27 at the Vallejo (CA) Community Center on 225 Amador St. between the hours of 3 and 8 p.m.

If you are interested in assisting with the memorial in any way please contact her son Will Flynn at AnubanUT2@gmail.com or any member of the Ruth Love family.

Thanks to all that truly cared about her and treated her with the respect she deserved. Let us rejoice, for she is truly at peace in the company of the Lord.

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Posted in Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 2, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Healthy Workplace Bill legislation: A 2014 perspective on distorted amendments

Monday, July 14th, 2014

The Healthy Workplace Campaign is WBI’s effort to enact anti-bullying legislation for the American workplace state by state. The model bill is called the Healthy Workplace Bill (HWB).


Features of the HWB

• Suffolk University Law Professor David C. Yamada, text author, used federal Title VII Civil Rights laws as basis

• Defines severe abusive conduct — does not use term workplace bullying

• Provides legal redress for anyone subjected to abusive conduct, whether or not the person is a member of a protected status group

• Requires that abusive conduct result in either demonstrable health or economic harm to plaintiff

• Plaintiffs who file lawsuits make public formerly hidden, confidential employer processes that hide and deny bullying

• Prohibits retaliation against any participant in procedures involved in dealing with the abusive conduct complaint

• Requires plaintiffs to hire private attorneys, no fiscal impact on state government

• Provides incentives (affirmative defenses) for employers who implement genuine corrective procedures

• Preserves managerial prerogative to discipline and terminate employees

• Does not interfere with state workers’ compensation laws or union CBAs

We named the HWB in 2002. All other uses of the name HWB are unauthorized by us. California first introduced the HWB in 2003. It has been carried in over half of states and two territories since. The Workplace Bullying Institute trains and provides support to a national network of volunteer Sate Coordinators who lobby their respective state legislators to sponsor the HWB. You can track its status at the HWB website.

Botched Amendments & Unanticipated Consequences

As authors of the HWB, we naturally want the full and original version of the bill enacted into law. And we realize compromises will be made during the process. It is “sausage making,” after all. We just wish all bill sponsors would refuse to allow major revisions that change the spirit of the bill from protecting abused workers to something else. Since the HWB was first introduced, different amendments have been proposed or made.

Often the well-intended sponsor, a pro-worker advocate, agrees to compromise adopting the belief that the law can be built in steps. Let’s get this version passed now and it will be revisited in the coming years and supplemented with the other desired provisions.

(more…)

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Posted in Employers Gone Wild: Doing Bad Things, Fairness & Social Justice Denied, Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), Tutorials About Bullying, Unions, WBI Education, Workplace Bullying Laws | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Untrustworthy stupid headlines about workplace bullying

Thursday, July 10th, 2014

Upon return from a short break, we found a jaw-dropping headline that cannot be believed.

96% of Workers are Bullied at Work!

The non-discerning press copied the press release from a consulting firm named Vital Smarts who have never been players in the workplace bullying arena. [See the US Academy roster to see who is doing credible and important work in America.]

Why do we at WBI say this company’s finding is not believable? Because they do not provide a definition nor describe their research methodology. We at WBI get a 97% bullied rate when we ask those who complete our online surveys. Of course we do. Who comes to this website seeking solutions to their personal problem and may also complete a survey? Bullied targets and witnesses. Our respondents are a “self-selected,” non-random sample. Our research reports clearly state when studies rely on bullied targets’ opinions only.

(more…)

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Posted in Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education, WBI Surveys & Studies | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



CBC: Workplace bullying at Wal Mart

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

Canadian TV on the CBC show The National investigated workplace bullying by telling the tale of one brave woman’s Wal Mart case. Key points made — employers ignore bullying and ignore evidence when presented by bullied targets and choose to not resolve it until pushed by lawsuits and the difficulty of proving intentional infliction of emotional distress. Also noteworthy is that the in-depth story was 9 min. long. (Are you paying attention US TV with your shallow 2 min. segments???)

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Posted in Broadcasts: Video, TV, radio, webinars, Media About Bullying, Target Tale, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Got a Minute? Coworker Witnesses

Saturday, June 14th, 2014

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Himmer: Workplace bullying and emotional intelligence

Friday, June 13th, 2014

By Richard P. Himmer, an Emotional Intelligence Consultant and Affiliate of the Workplace Bullying Institute. He is conducting research for his dissertation and will soon be soliciting for volunteers to be part of the study. He can be reached at EQMicroSkills.com.


For many employees, going to work each day requires all their strength — not because they are physically challenged, but because they have a bully in their life. Fifty-two percent of a target’s day is spent avoiding the bully. Workplace bullying is described as psychological terror and it continues to escalate.

In 1996, 75 percent of surveyed organizations said they had no bullying in their organization, executives in sum denied that it existed. In a recent 2014 survey by the Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI) more than 65 million American workers are affected by what is called the American Cancer and public awareness is 72 percent.

(more…)

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When your past bully is your job reference

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Bullied targets need to work to live after leaving the job where they were bullied. As if recovering is not a large or difficult enough task, getting the next job will require offering references attesting to your skills. No matter how well you pick references, the next employer will reflexively find the name of your last boss even if not on the list you provide.

It’s as if you cannot be believed, but because she or he was your boss, that person is credible to the next boss. Yikes. What if that boss was your bully? Best to find out what is being said about you. Too bad, we are not yet at the stage in the U.S. where everyone recognizes that being bullied had nothing to do with the person targeted.

So, find out what that idiot is saying about you. Use the reference checker we have recommended for years — Allison & Taylor of Rochester, NY. Here’s a short clip by the company rep explaining how willing bad bosses are to give negative, job-killing references.

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