Archive for the ‘Tutorials About Bullying’ Category


Judge orders shame for neighborhood bully

Monday, April 14th, 2014

This news is really gonna upset bully apologists who worry so much about the tender sensibilities of offenders (and less about the harm inflicted by these creeps).

Northeast Ohio Media Group, April 13, 2014

SOUTH EUCLID, Ohio — The man accused of bullying his neighbors for 15 years, including children with developmental disabilities, carried out part of his punishment on Sunday by sitting at a busy intersection with a large sign that says he’s a bully.

Edmond Aviv, 62, endured five hours of people yelling at him from passing cars while holding a sign that said: “I AM A BULLY! I pick on children that are disabled, and I am intolerant of those that are different from myself. My actions do not reflect an appreciation for the diverse South Euclid community that I live in.”

Aviv, who ignored the comments and rarely looked up, said the judge’s sentence and ensuing media coverage that garnered national and international attention ruined his life. He also denied he bullied the family.

“The judge destroyed me,” said Aviv, who refused to answer other questions. “This isn’t fair at all.”

(more…)

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Posted in Broadcasts: Video, TV, radio, webinars, Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Forbes: Is your boss a bully?

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

By Carol Kinsey Goman, Forbes, April 6, 2014

I met Brenda when she managed a 2,000-person department for a Fortune 500 company. Brought in to help her with an upcoming change initiative, I was impressed by Brenda’s intelligence, creativity, political savvy, and dedication to her job. She had all the qualities of a senior executive – which was her career goal.

But she was also a bully. One direct report described her as a “kiss-up and slap-down kind of manager.” The targets of the bullying were especially demoralized, but even those on her staff who only witnessed the bad behavior began to devote more energy to protecting themselves than they did to helping the company. Brenda’s dysfunctional management style eventually led to a decline in her department’s performance and, as a result, the change initiative was abandoned. Eventually Brenda’s career was derailed by the increasing number of enemies she made with every nasty glare and mean-spirited remark. She resigned when it became obvious that she would never get the promotion she coveted.

Stories about bullies don’t always end with them resigning in disgrace. In fact, many bullies thrive. You may even be working for one.

(more…)

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Announcing the U.S. Academy on Workplace Bullying, Mobbing, and Abuse

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

U.S. Academy on Workplace Bullying, Mobbing and Abuse

The Workplace Bullying Institute and the New Workplace Institute are happy to announce the launch of a joint initiative, the U.S. Academy on Workplace Bullying, Mobbing, and Abuse, which will support and promote the multi-disciplinary work of leading and emerging educators, researchers, practitioners, writers, and advocates who are dedicated to understanding, preventing, stopping, and responding to workplace bullying and related forms of interpersonal mistreatment.

“For over a year, we’ve been contemplating how to bring together an American network of leading and emerging experts on workplace bullying and related topics. The Academy is our conduit for doing so. We look forward to highlighting the good works of these incredible people,” says David Yamada, Suffolk University law professor and New Workplace Institute director.

The Academy has over 50 Fellows including leading psychological researchers, physicians, attorneys, occupational health experts, professors of management, nursing, and communications, counselors, union trainers, military leaders, advocates, and consultants. The complete list of Fellows can be seen at workplacebullyingacademy.com.

“When we started WBI there was one trade unionist and a couple of academic researchers with the courage to focus on workplace bullying. Since then the field exploded exponentially,” says Gary Namie, PhD, Co-founder of the Workplace Bullying Institute, established in 1997. “We recognize the universality of these destructive behaviors, and this network focuses on the unique challenges posed by American employee relations, mental health, and legal systems.”

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Posted in Bullying-Related Research, Good News, Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 2, Products & Services, Social/Mgmt/Epid Sciences, Tutorials About Bullying, Unions, WBI Education | 1 Archived Comment | Post A Comment () »



Executives can stop workplace bullying

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

Executives dwell in the C-Suite. By rank, they are often referred to as “leaders,” though leadership is a demonstrable skill instead of a position on an organization chart. Executive leaders in charge are the ones who set the operating the rules for their organizations. They establish the climate that can either foster and encourage bullying abusive conduct or they can act with indifference toward it (a laissez-faire management style) which allows bullies to run wild with impunity.

Given the clout executives have, they can stop bullying if they want to. Here are the steps they can take to make their organizations bullying free. [It's a good idea to have them read first The Bully-Free Workplace to understand the barriers that await implementation of any plan.]

(more…)

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Bullying college coach (again) – woman-on-women

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

Kelly Greenberg has been coach of the women’s basketball team at Boston University for 10 years, and at the University of Pennsylvania and Holy Cross for a total of 12 years before that. Her style has been described as “difficult,” and bullying by the Boston Globe.

This season, four scholarship players walked away from the team, tired of the emotional abuse Greenberg directed at them. Without scholarships that BU might take back, staying in school there is an expensive proposition. From the Globe article, here are some statements by the women players.

“I arrived feeling very confident and motivated. Then I felt bullied, threatened, and emotionally abused by the coach. By the time I left, she had demolished me as a person. She didn’t treat us like human beings at all” … Dana Theobald

“I discovered that when you play for Coach Greenberg, you don’t play the game you love. You play her game, an emotional game that is not about basketball.” … Melissa Gallo

And from the student who was taken to hospital when suicide was contemplated

“Basketball is a contact sport. We have all played for tough coaches. But I went to BU because I believed [Greenberg] was a great coach, and I was shocked by how it turned out. It was very scary. I was blaming everything on myself because of the way I had been treated. I knew deep inside that it wasn’t me, but I was too afraid to say it was [Greenberg] because she didn’t make me feel supported. Giving up a $60,000-a-year scholarship is the hardest thing I’ve ever done. I hate that I’m not in school, but it had to be done. My spirit was broken.” … Dionna Joynes

These comments are completely consistent with the experiences of bullied targets. The bullying was not about the sport of basketball (the equivalent of work-related tasks) but about Greenberg’s volatile emotionality. Finally, illustrating the perfect fit with the phenomenon of bullying, the targets lost their jobs (the sport) they loved because they were involuntarily emotionally abused.

It seems coach Greenberg had trouble with players who were injured. She assaulted them as “selfish” after suffering a concussion or ankle injury.

When two players quit previously and the university conducted its “investigation,” Greenberg was made aware that she is difficult and that she had made regrettable mistakes.

Let’s see if BU renews Greenberg’s contract. Read the full story in the Globe.

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Posted in Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



HS magazine tackles internal “rape culture,” censored by “adult” principal

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

Our societal tendency to blame victims of all sorts undercuts our ability to make systemic changes. If individuals are responsible rather than schools, employers and man-made (sic) organizations, then nothing ever has to change.

This is one of the many forms of resistance we face in the workplace bullying movement.

An interesting case surfaced in which a Wisconsin high school principal, Jon Wiltzius, was upset with a story published in the student’s monthly magazine. The editors bravely took on the topic of rape and blaming victims in their school. Three victims told their stories anonymously. Kudos for editors-in-chief Rachel Schneider and Tanvi Kumar.

The cover story ruffled the feathers of the principal responsible for the organizational (building) culture. His reaction — to cite case law that the District has control, not the student editors, over the publication — rather than hold an assembly to have all students discuss what may contribute to the normalization of sexual assault in high school and what his school could do about it. Oops. Guess the students are more adult about this serious topic than the principal who chooses to duck his responsibility.

Watch the WBAY-TV, ABC affiliate in Green Bay report

Read the well-written, truthful article on pages 11-16 of the student publication Cardinal Columns at Fond-du-Lac High School.

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Posted in Broadcasts: Video, TV, radio, webinars, Commentary by G. Namie, Media About Bullying, The New America, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Rare news: Bullied target gets new NFL job — Jonathan Martin

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

This may be the happy ending denied so many bullied targets. The most famous of all targets in recent times, Jonathan Martin, has landed a new job. He was traded by the Miami Dolphins, the team with the abusive work environment that compelled him to voluntarily leave, to the 49ers coached by Jim Harbaugh, his college coach at Stanford.

And he’s happy. Read the press account.

WBI research with bullied targets found that after bullying, 29% made more money, 37% were not bullied again, 65% were not able to match their lost income, and 26% never found another job. So, Jonathan Martin is one of the lucky ones. Of course, he still has to win a job on the 53-man roster this summer, but at least he has been given the chance.

We wish him luck.

###

For now, it appears this story ends, you can follow the full NFL story from the start in the Category list in the sidebar: NFL: Jonathan Martin Read the NFL investigation report.

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Posted in Good News, NFL: Jonathan Martin, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education, WBI Surveys & Studies | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Workplace Bullying a teleconference for attorneys & employers

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

On March 11,
the Young Lawyer Division of the Employment Law Section of the
American Bar Association,
sponsored a teleconference for its members.

Workplace Bullying

Listen to the 60 min. teleconference here.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Moderator:

Lindsey Wagner, Cathleen Scott & Associates, Jupiter, FL
, 561.653.0008

Speakers:

Dr. Gary Namie, The Workplace Bullying Institute
    Introduction to the topic for attorneys

Monique Gougisha Doucette, Ogletree Deakins, New Orleans, LA, 504.648.3842
    View from management side; what employers can do

Kerri Stone, Florida International University, Miami, FL, 305.348.1154
    About the Healthy Workplace Bill; NLRA prohibitions; policies

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Posted in Broadcasts: Video, TV, radio, webinars, Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), Media About Bullying, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education, Workplace Bullying Laws | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Issa should be embarassed by his bullying conduct

Friday, March 7th, 2014

US Congressman Darrell Issa, chair of the House Oversight Committee bullied fellow Congressman Elijah Cummings and below is the video record of it recorded by C-SPAN. Issa allowed no one to testify at this Wed. March 5 hearing held to humiliate former IRS worker Lois Lerner who invoked her 5th Amendment right to not give self-incriminating answers to Issa’s questions. Rep. Cummings had something to say, but Rep. Issa turned off his microphone twice. Issa adjourned the hearing while the outraged Cummings attempted to speak.

Bullied targets have borne the brunt of a bully’s contempt similar to that demonstrated by Issa.

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Posted in Broadcasts: Video, TV, radio, webinars, Media About Bullying, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



HR tutorial on handling Depression at work

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

New from your friends in the legal-averse HR industry: a webinar for HR folks on how to avoid granting (un)paid leave or making federal law mandated accommodations for people with mental disabilities called depression.

Session title: “Depression in the Workplace”

A rational person would think the session would be led by a psychologist, but nooo, it’s an attorney from the Eyres Law Group. Of course, if you or I non-attorneys professed to opine on subjects delving into the application of laws, we would be accused of an illegal act. But attorneys believe mental health and psychology are something not requiring any training or specialization.

The webinar topic list is upsetting, given what we know about the trauma that workplace bullying causes. And the fact that 49% of bullied individuals suffer clinical depression for the first time in their lives at the hands of an abuser at work!

Look at these webinar goals:

• How to tell if a depressed employee is “disabled” under the ADA’s mental impairment definition (WBI: the only thing worse than attorneys playing psychologist is HR doing the same. Yikes!)

• Whether depression is generally a “covered” disability if it’s the result of an underlying medical condition or due to an emotional trauma (WBI: which, of course, would never be caused BY the workplace)

• The medical inquires, limited examinations, and documentation you may legally request that the employee provide in support of a need for leave as accommodation (WBI: here’s where employers hire their own hack shrink who conducts an “independent” medical exam guaranteed to conclude that the problem is not real, these medical professionals rarely practice outside employer panels)

• How to respond to erratic attendance and persistent tardiness, including when to raise potential FMLA leave as an option (WBI: FMLA, in most cases is unpaid leave forcing workers to stay on the job against their physicians’ advice)

• How to successfully manage intermittent leave for chronic depression and curb potential FMLA abuse related to depressed workers (WBI: yes, abuse of unpaid leave is surely a chronic problem in the American laborforce that works more hours than workers in any other industrialized nation because there is no paid sick leave policies and leaves must be begged for. This smells like employer paranoia. Too bad employers don’t have to answer yet for real abuse, abuse of employees!)

• When you may legally discipline or terminate an employee with depression without sparking liability under federal disability and leave laws (WBI: Ah yes, the real agenda — how to fire the harmed employee.)

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Posted in Employers Gone Wild: Doing Bad Things, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



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