Posts Tagged ‘bully bosses’


Webinar for HR: When the workplace bully is the boss

Saturday, February 7th, 2015

Wednesday Feb. 11 Webinar for Employers & HR
2 pm EST, 60 minutes
A joint production of the Workplace Bullying Institute and Biz21 Publishing



When the Bully is the Boss

Many companies assume they don’t have a bullying problem. Employees get along. In meetings, team members respect each other. But look closer. You might find that the bully is the very person you would expect your employees to turn to if they are being bullied—the boss.

Some managerial bullying is unintentional — supervisors see themselves as “demanding results.” Other times bosses know their behavior crosses the line, but don’t care.
Not convinced? Consider the slew of new state laws protecting workers against bullying. And consider the number of companies that have rushed to adopt anti-bullying policies and procedures for investigating complaints.

The costs are real. The employee’s health can suffer, causing missed work, higher healthcare costs and reduced productivity. Bullied employees are also a flight risk, as are those who witness bullying. And there’s the threat of lawsuits against the company.

In this session, Dr. Gary Namie will teach you:

• How to recognize and respond to a bully boss
• What differentiates “bullying” from other conduct- both illegal (discrimination) and legal (non-abusive disagreements)
• Why the workplace climate may be allowing the bully to prosper
• Why owners and executives often tend to defend bullies
• How to build an abuse-intolerant, accountable culture for all employees, regardless of rank
• How to measure outcomes of anti-bullying activities that benefit both employees and the company.


To Register for the Webinar

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Posted in Events & Appearances, Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 2 | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Workplace Bullying: Perpetrator Rank & Number in the U.S.

Monday, April 28th, 2014

PERPETRATOR RANK & NUMBER in 2014

Mobbing was the term adopted by Heinz Leymann to describe health-harming abusive conduct at work. Mobbing implies multiple perpetrators. Mobbing preceded the term workplace bullying. However, WBI has consistently defined bullying as committed by one or more persons. Bullying nearly always escalates to more than one person joining the main instigator to torment the target.

Question: Who was (were) the principal perpetrator(s)?



Respondents said the following:

In 14% of cases, the bullying was generated by a combination of perpetrators operating at different levels of the organization – bosses, peers, and subordinates.

With respect to perpetrator’s rank, not counting the combined sources cases:


This pattern is consistent with previous WBI national Surveys.

No interactions between rank and race or rank and gender were found.

When perpetrators enjoy a higher organizational rank than targets, opportunities to abuse authority present themselves. Further, the likelihood of targets being able to confront the boss about her or his unacceptable conduct approaches zero, given the difficulty of crossing the “power gradient.” Coworker, peer-to-peer, bullying may not involve power differences, but the health harm caused by social exclusion/ostracism that peers employ poses an equal, if not greater, threat to the target’s safety.

Download the Perpetrator Rank & Number mini-Report
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Gary Namie, PhD, Research Director
Research Assistants: Daniel Christensen & David Phillips

© 2014, Workplace Bullying Institute, All Rights Reserved

Download the complete Report | Access individual sections of the Report

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Posted in WBI Education, WBI Surveys & Studies | 1 Archived Comment | Post A Comment () »



Wanna Be a Workplace Bully for Halloween? Costume advice here.

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012


Halloween has become the new major holiday. Partying adults account for much of the spending after the candy and kiddie costumes. So, maybe you want to be a bully at work in costume this year. What would that look like?

No worries. Come as you are. Bullies are rarely different than most of us. They don’t dress differently. This will save you lots of dough. No special costume required. And only under special circumstances do they think differently. Here’s what I mean.

(more…)

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Posted in Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



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