Posts Tagged ‘David Yamada’


Announcing the U.S. Academy on Workplace Bullying, Mobbing, and Abuse

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

U.S. Academy on Workplace Bullying, Mobbing and Abuse

The Workplace Bullying Institute and the New Workplace Institute are happy to announce the launch of a joint initiative, the U.S. Academy on Workplace Bullying, Mobbing, and Abuse, which will support and promote the multi-disciplinary work of leading and emerging educators, researchers, practitioners, writers, and advocates who are dedicated to understanding, preventing, stopping, and responding to workplace bullying and related forms of interpersonal mistreatment.

“For over a year, we’ve been contemplating how to bring together an American network of leading and emerging experts on workplace bullying and related topics. The Academy is our conduit for doing so. We look forward to highlighting the good works of these incredible people,” says David Yamada, Suffolk University law professor and New Workplace Institute director.

The Academy has over 50 Fellows including leading psychological researchers, physicians, attorneys, occupational health experts, professors of management, nursing, and communications, counselors, union trainers, military leaders, advocates, and consultants. The complete list of Fellows can be seen at workplacebullyingacademy.com.

“When we started WBI there was one trade unionist and a couple of academic researchers with the courage to focus on workplace bullying. Since then the field exploded exponentially,” says Gary Namie, PhD, Co-founder of the Workplace Bullying Institute, established in 1997. “We recognize the universality of these destructive behaviors, and this network focuses on the unique challenges posed by American employee relations, mental health, and legal systems.”

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Posted in Bullying-Related Research, Good News, Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 2, Products & Services, Social/Mgmt/Epid Sciences, Tutorials About Bullying, Unions, WBI Education | 1 Archived Comment | Post A Comment () »



WBI Podcast: David Yamada

Friday, March 7th, 2014

Another piece of older audio from a radio program featuring Dr. Namie. Law Professor David Yamada joins the podcast with a history lesson to share. The topic is the origins of employment law in the U.S. that governs the workplace. Unfortunately, the relationship between Master and Servant is the starting point. And not much has changed since. The question for Prof. Yamada is whether assurances of dignity and equality for workers is possible given current laws. Yamada is the author of the anti-bullying Healthy Workplace Bill.

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Professor David Yamada on Greater Boston-TV

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

Hear opponents of our anti-bullying Healthy Workplace Bill, then supporters, including Suffolk University Law Professor, WBI Affiliate and HWB author, David Yamada.

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Posted in Broadcasts: Video, TV, radio, webinars, Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign) | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Gazette: When it comes to workplace bullying, employees have limited options

Monday, January 27th, 2014

The (Eastern Iowa) Gazette, Jan. 26, 2014

Greater awareness helps in coping with the problem — but some companies ignore it

The thing about work place bullying is, it’s been there all along.

What’s different today is that it is wrong, and we know it.

At a time when solutions to bullying among school-aged students is being heavily discussed on a national scale, some say the name-calling, humiliation and intimidation that comes along with bullying has become a silent epidemic throughout America’s work force.

And because workplace bullying — which the Workplace Bullying Institute defines as repeated, health-harming mistreatment of one or more persons by one or more perpetrators — is not illegal in any of the 50 states, those affected often have few options available when it occurs.

According to a 2012 Career Builder Survey, 35 percent of workers said they have felt bullied at work, and 17 percent decided to quit their jobs because of the situation. The survey was conducted on online by market research company Harris Interactive and included 3,892 full-time, not self-employed, non-government workers over the age of 18.

Gary Namie, director of the Workplace Bullying Institute, based in Bellingham, Wash., said the issue gets worse when fewer jobs are available, providing a person who feels they are experiencing the bullying with fewer escape routes.

“Its always been there, it’s just a matter of considering it wrong,” Namie said. “What’s new is that it’s wrong, because it is all too often considered routine.

“Management wants you to think this is a routine managerial prerogative, not a problem, and it need not be.”

Namie and his wife, Ruth, founded the Workplace Bulling Institute in 1997 after Ruth experienced bullying at her own job. Now, the group blogs on the topic, runs studies on workplace bullying and is working to get a Healthy Workplace Bill passed to help fix the problem and help raise awareness.
(more…)

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Workforce: Bullying, bigotry and a bill

Monday, January 6th, 2014

Bullying, Bigotry and a Bill to Prevent Picking on All Personnel
by Frank Kalman, Workforce, Jan. 5, 2014

Unless bullying involves discrimination, it’s mostly legal to be a jerk at work. Some are trying to change that.

Culture is a powerful force, especially in the workplace.

In the right setting, high-stress, high-profile workplaces such as hospitals, law enforcement offices and professional sports teams can promote a culture of camaraderie and teamwork while producing positive results. However, big egos also can quickly reign supreme, leaving an environment ripe for intimidation and bullying. With no laws specifically preventing workplace bullying — unless the conduct involves discrimination — it’s legal to be a jerk at work, experts say.

Workplace culture likely played a role in a recent high-profile bullying case that became national news with the National Football League’s Miami Dolphins. In midseason, offensive lineman Jonathan Martin unexpectedly left the Dolphins saying he was being harassed by teammates, including fellow lineman Richie Incognito.

(more…)

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Posted in Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), Media About Bullying, NFL: Jonathan Martin, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, WBI in the News, Workplace Bullying Laws | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Cobb: Workplace Bullying: USA Versus Much of the World

Monday, November 25th, 2013

By Ellen Pinkos Cobb, Isoceles Group, Nov. 18, 2013

With alleged harassment on the Miami Dolphins football team, there is increased discussion of workplace bullying. It’s about time. The United States lags behind many countries in this area.

As a start: think about sexual harassment. It’s not done. And yet, it was done, flagrantly, constantly, with a wink and a nod, until not that long ago. It still happens, but less, and public perception has changed. In the United States, workplace bullying has been found to be four times more prevalent than sexual harassment.

A 2010 Zogby International survey of adult Americans (commissioned by the Workplace Bullying Institute) showed that 35% reported personally being bullied at work. Of the respondents, 64% supported having laws to protect workers from “malicious, health-harming abusive conduct” committed by bosses and co-workers.

Despite these findings, an employee can still be a target of bullying in the workplace in the US and have no legal recourse. State and federal laws do not cover acts of harassment unless based on characteristics covered by law, such as race, religion, gender, or disability. Numerous states have introduced anti-bullying legislation drafted by Suffolk Law School Professor David Yamada. None have been enacted. Yet.

The US would do well to look around the world. Numerous countries have legislation to protect workers from bullying. Canada, Australia, and nine European countries have enacted anti-bullying laws, including Sweden, France, and Denmark, and Serbia. As of January 1, 2014, an Australian worker who believes he or she has been bullied may apply to the Fair Work Commission for an investigation and if cause is found, have an order issued to the employer to stop the bullying.

Costs to workplaces in which bullying is allowed to occur include loss of skill and experience when a worker leaves due to being bullied, lowered employee morale, medical and insurance costs, and harm to a company’s reputation. Research has shown that workers who witness bullying can have a stronger urge to quit than those who experience it firsthand.

Under workplace health and safety laws, employers have a duty of care to provide a safe work environment for employees. This requirement is often interpreted to require ensuring persons in the workplace are both mentally and physically safe at work and increasingly interpreted to require a workplace free from bullying.

It is time for public perception on workplace bullying to change. Maybe, with attention focused on the complexities of the Dolphins situation, it will.

Ellen Pinkos Cobb, Esq.is Senior Regulatory & Legal Analyst for the The Isosceles Group.

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Follow the full NFL story in the Category list in the sidebar: NFL: Jonathan Martin

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Posted in Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), Media About Bullying, NFL: Jonathan Martin, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, WBI in the News | 1 Archived Comment | Post A Comment () »



Yamada: Masters & Servants

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

WBI’s colleague, Professor David Yamada of Suffolk University and author of the Healthy Workplace Bill, just published a great piece about the roots of American employment law.

Here’s a link to the Minding the Workplace blog article.

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Posted in Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), Workplace Bullying Laws | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Workplace Bullying Policy and Procedures Made Simple

Monday, September 16th, 2013

Self-guided program on DVD for employers of all sizes leads to the creation of a comprehensive, defensible policy to prevent and correct workplace bullying from the recognized originator of the workplace bullying consulting field in North America.

Recognition of workplace bullying is at an all time high and employers are beginning to addressing. Workplace Bullying Institute research shows that only 5.5% of U.S. employers are adequately dealing with the problem in their organizations. In a 2013 survey of business executives, 68% indicated it was a serious problem. Many employers don’t know where to start. 
Since launching the U.S. anti-workplace bullying movement in 1997, Dr. Gary Namie has worked with organizations to create policies and procedures. For the first time, and only from WBI, companies of all sizes can now apply the same writing method normally facilitated by Dr. Namie in person.


”We wanted to remove all barriers for all employers to stopping bullying,” according to Dr. Namie, “Employees are clamoring for protection and this is our plan to accelerate the changes businesses must make to stem the losses.”

The cost is $299 so that small businesses can protect themselves against the losses incurred by a workplace bully.

The DVD is best used by an assembled team of workers called the Policy Writing Group or the appropriate authority in small firms. Instructions are provided that allow the group to create the most comprehensive set of policy provisions, informal solutions, and formal enforcement procedures. Law professor David C. Yamada discusses legal and liability issues associated with policy creation. Only those who work at your organization understand the idiosyncrasies of their unique workplace culture. This DVD results in a policy specific to your organization with all of the accompanying ethical and logistical questions answered.





For product information visit The Work Doctor® Website

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Posted in Good News, Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 2, Products & Services | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



The reason WBI is all about helping targets of workplace bullying

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

We have explained in detail elsewhere why the Workplace Bullying Institute is not neutral in the war between unsolicited aggressors (bullies, mobbers) and involuntary victims (targets). WBI is target-centric. We’ve chosen sides. Bullies have their own powerful, funded support groups; they call them employers.

Now comes an eloquent letter from a bullied target posted by WBI colleague David Yamada at his Minding the Workplace blog. Lily, the author, explains painfully why she deserves our help. How could a caring human being believe otherwise?

Read her description of enduring misery.

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Posted in Guest Articles, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Unemployment insurance for NY targets of workplace bullying

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

WBI colleague and Suffolk University Law Professor David Yamada reports in his blog that unemployment insurance is possible for workers who voluntarily quit because of workplace bullying. The examples are specific to New York state, but there is hope. He writes:

disrespectful and bullying-type behaviors that exceed the bounds of propriety (that appears to be the key phrase) may constitute good cause to voluntarily leave a job and thus not disqualify someone from receiving unemployment benefits.

Actual case file numbers are provided in his essay for use in other states. Thanks to David for adding another tool to the survival kit for bullied targets.

Read the blog, Minding the Workplace.

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Posted in Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | 1 Archived Comment | Post A Comment () »



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