Posts Tagged ‘fundamental attribution error’


HS magazine tackles internal “rape culture,” censored by “adult” principal

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

Our societal tendency to blame victims of all sorts undercuts our ability to make systemic changes. If individuals are responsible rather than schools, employers and man-made (sic) organizations, then nothing ever has to change.

This is one of the many forms of resistance we face in the workplace bullying movement.

An interesting case surfaced in which a Wisconsin high school principal, Jon Wiltzius, was upset with a story published in the student’s monthly magazine. The editors bravely took on the topic of rape and blaming victims in their school. Three victims told their stories anonymously. Kudos for editors-in-chief Rachel Schneider and Tanvi Kumar.

The cover story ruffled the feathers of the principal responsible for the organizational (building) culture. His reaction — to cite case law that the District has control, not the student editors, over the publication — rather than hold an assembly to have all students discuss what may contribute to the normalization of sexual assault in high school and what his school could do about it. Oops. Guess the students are more adult about this serious topic than the principal who chooses to duck his responsibility.

Watch the WBAY-TV, ABC affiliate in Green Bay report

Read the well-written, truthful article on pages 11-16 of the student publication Cardinal Columns at Fond-du-Lac High School.

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Posted in Broadcasts: Video, TV, radio, webinars, Commentary by G. Namie, Media About Bullying, The New America, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Military leaders (again) protect rapists, blame victim

Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

In bullying cases, it is not shocking to read that targets are blamed for their fate — weak, thin-skinned, provocative. Victim blaming is societal, reflecting the commission of the fundamental attribution error.

To blame a woman for her own sexual assault or rape is especially hideous. Yet that is what U.S. military commanders do repeatedly. [Watch The Invisible War] Regarding the recent complaint brought by Marine Arianna Klay, her husband, Ben, tells that her commander said that she should have expected it (the attack by multiple rapists) because she was wearing shorts!!!

There are two proposed legislative solutions proffered in the U.S. Senate:

(1) Keep military unit commanders in charge of “investigations” to police themselves, and

(2) Remove commanders from the investigatory process. This is the Military Justice Improvement Act proposed by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) and 57 co-sponsors.

(more…)

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Posted in Employers Gone Wild: Doing Bad Things, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | 1 Archived Comment | Post A Comment () »



Research: Explaining peer condemnation of targets of workplace bullying

Thursday, September 19th, 2013

WBI review of an academic research study:

Diekmann, K.A., Walker, S.D.S., Galinsky, A.D., & Tenbrunsel, A.E. (2012) Double victimization in the workplace: Why observers condemn passive victims of sexual harassment. Organization Science, 2012, 1-15.

A well practiced tendency of observers of workplace harassment, coworkers of the targeted person, is to declare that they themselves would have taken more action to stop the harassment than the victim did.

The researchers in this study call this prediction “forecasting,” and people claim they would do more than they actually do. They have an optimism bias, especially with respect to moral or socially desirable conduct. No one wants to admit they would not do “the right thing” when opportunities present themselves. And there is an equal underestimation of how likely they would be to yield to social pressure and self-interest.

A common consequence of such observer hubris is the subsequent condemnation of victims for failing to have acted — to resist, to confront, to report, to reverse the harassment. Of course, as WBI research shows, confrontation fails to stop the negative conduct and leads to retaliation of the victim which exacerbates the suffering.

Staying passive is the preferred choice of both sexual harassment victims and bullied targets. From their perspective, it is safer than alternatives. However, observers may interpret passivity as weakness. Thus, harassment victims are harmed twice over.

(more…)

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Posted in Bullying-Related Research, Social/Mgmt/Epid Sciences, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | 1 Archived Comment | Post A Comment () »



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