Posts Tagged ‘healthcare bullying’


Hospital unlawfully fired nurse who complained of bullying

Sunday, August 12th, 2012

In December 2009 CEO Ryan Smith of Central Peninsula Hospital in Soldotna Alaska brought us in to implement our comprehensive program to prevent and correct workplace bullying. One year prior, there had been an on-site gunslinging event that claimed two lives, the shooter, fired employee Joseph Marchetti, and one of his victims. Others were paralyzed and wounded.

Trouble had been brewing beforehand. There is nearly always a story behind the headline-grabbing “shooter as mental nut” cover story (the theme of the documentary Murder By Proxy). A VP of the nurses union, Ray Southwell, had briefed his fellow union members and the CPH Board that “the environment is ripe for another shooting.” He spoke regularly of bullying of nurses. Smith hated Southwell. Eventually, Smith, who had been brought in to “clean up” certain departments fired Southwell.

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Posted in Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, Rulings by Courts, Tutorials About Bullying, Unions, WBI Education, Workplace Bullying Laws | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



First U.S. “Bullying” Trial

Friday, May 15th, 2009

Doescher vs. Raess, Indiana, Marion County (Indianapolis), March 2005

Jury found Dr. Raess guilty of battery, awarded plaintiff Doescher $325,000

Expert witness:  Dr. Gary Namie, WBI

Appellate Court reversal

2008 Indiana Supreme Court restoral of trial verdict and award for plaintiff

Read the entire story and view the Supreme Court hearing

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Posted in Fairness & Social Justice Denied, Rulings by Courts, Tutorials About Bullying | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Drunk Neurosurgeon Bully

Wednesday, May 13th, 2009

This outburst in the OR by a surgeon is not uncommon. We know from consulting to hospitals who want to curb bullying that extreme misconduct against nurses is standard M.O. for many surgeons who rule their “kingdoms.” And for once, the nurses got to see the bully temporarily brought down.

This type of conduct is what I read as an expert witness in court cases involving bullying physicians. Similar things happened in the trial dubbed the “first bullying trial” in Indianapolis, IN in March, 2005 in which I testified.

How rare were angry, hostile, bullying rants by Castro-Moure? Was this the first and only time that an otherwise respectful, gentle man exploded? Not likely. The statement by the chief medical officer about Castro-Moure’s normalcy means little. He probably never works directly with him in the OR, the workplace that bully surgeons terrorize. He only sees him through an administrative lens and as a fellow physician, a club member deserving protection. (more…)

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Posted in Bullying & Health, Employers Gone Wild: Doing Bad Things | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Abusive Bosses in Medical Fields Targeted

Wednesday, February 4th, 2009

By James Thalmanr Deseret News (Salt Lake City, UT) February 4, 2009

Hospitals would become bully-free zones and bad-boss behavior prohibited in state statute under a bill that a legislative review committee on Tuesday earmarked for interim study.

Despite opposition to the bill by the head of the state Division of Risk Management, former district Judge Roger Livingston, counter testimony from disgruntled health-care workers who support HB224 was too compelling for lawmakers to ignore.

They heard and were given written accounts of ostensibly competent, caring medical providers being driven from their jobs and even out of the state by supervisors who induce stress in an already high-stress occupation. The hyper-patrolling and controlling oversight — which included employees having to ask to go the bathroom are far from uncommon and are adding injury to the insult in the form of serious mistakes and harm to patients, committee members were told.

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Posted in Bullying & Health, Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), WBI in the News | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Lawmakers May Study Abusive Workplace Issues

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009

By Heather May Salt Lake Tribune February 3, 2009

This summer, lawmakers may study whether they can and should outlaw “an abusive work environment” in government-owned health care settings, such as the University of Utah.

Members of the House Health and Human Services weren’t ready to legislate against bad behavior, and instead recommended HB224 be studied.

Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, said the bill is aimed mainly at residency programs where there have been instances of supervisors targeting trainees with verbal abuse or behavior aimed at undermining their work, forcing them to quit.

Bill supporters noted current law doesn’t protect employees from such abuse unless the harassment is based on sex or race. They said intimidating behavior can psychologically harm employees and can lead to medical errors when providers are scared to speak up. A national accrediting agency now requires hospitals to have codes of conduct on such behavior.

But opponents, including the state’s risk manager, said it would be a vast departure from current law. And they said it would invite lawsuits, since it would be creating a new protected class of employees in what is now a right-to-work state.

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Posted in Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), WBI in the News | 5 Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Trends: Putting a Stop to Medical Road Rage

Saturday, January 17th, 2009

By Melissa Knopper Clinician Reviews January 17, 2009

Joseph Doescher and Daniel Raess worked side by side in the operating room at St. Francis Hospital in Beech Grove, Indiana. Doescher and the other perfusionists often had to put up with yelling, swearing, and belittling comments from Raess, the heart surgeon. Finally, Doescher reported the behavior to his supervisor. Raess got wind of it and retaliated.

In subsequent court proceedings, Doescher described looking up at Raess’ red face and popping veins. He was afraid Raess was going to hit him. In the end, Doescher left his job with a debilitating case of depression. Later, he sued Raess and was awarded $325,000 in compensatory (but not punitive) damages.

Shortly after the Indiana Supreme Court decided this high-profile medical case, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) issued a safety alert, requiring hospitals to adopt a zero-tolerance policy toward workplace bullying.

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Posted in Bullying & Health, Rulings by Courts, WBI in the News | 4 Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



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