Posts Tagged ‘HR’


Tuscaloosa Alabama city council approves Workplace Bullying policy

Sunday, October 19th, 2014

Just in time for WBI’s Freedom from Workplace Bullies Week, James Woodson, Tuscaloosa Senior Assistant City Attorney introduced and the city council passed its first-ever workplace bullying policy (Ordinance No. 8144, Oct. 14, 2014). As documented elsewhere at the WBI site, a policy is necessary but not sufficient to comprehensively prevent and correct bullying. But it is a good preliminary step by any employer. Tuscaloosa will follow with training for staff and managers. We commend Mr. Woodson and the council. Woodson told his local TV station

“It wasn’t that many years ago that employers were adopting for the first time sexual harassment policies, then that became anti-harassment policies, and I think this is a natural extension to bullying, to essentially catch all of the inappropriate workplace behavior.”

[Earlier in 2014, Tennessee became the first state to encourage government agencies as employers to adopt policies to address abusive conduct.]

Here are the policy’s strengths and shortcomings.

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Posted in Freedom Week, Good News, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



It takes all of us to stop workplace bullying. What you can do for Freedom Week.

Saturday, October 18th, 2014

Workplace bullying is a complex phenomenon because it is systemic with the majority of causes dwelling in the work environment, organizational culture. It is much more than personalities of targets and perpetrators. Thus, to stop it, we all need to pressure employers to stop running on autopilot and allowing bullying to happen as a normal routine way of doing business.

Here are WBI’s suggested actions for each of us in different roles and professions to pressure employers to reign in their out-of-control miscreants, to stop rewarding the misconduct, and to establish a positive workplace culture free of abusive conduct for the future.

Bullied Targets/Individuals
Family & Friends
Co-Workers and Witnesses
Unions
Medical Professionals
Employers/Executives
Mental Health Professionals
School Administrators
Community Leaders
State Legislators

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Posted in Freedom Week, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Career Builder survey on workplace bullying

Monday, September 29th, 2014

Career Builder commissioned an online Harris Poll to survey employed full-time private sector U.S. respondents. The prevalence of bullying was 28%. Career Builder findings can be extrapolated to their sample — people with full-time jobs in the private sector working for someone else.

Career Builder defined workplace bullying as

unwanted, aggressive behavior that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is often repeated over time. Bullying can include actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, and excluding someone from a group on purpose.

The only diversion from traditional definitions is the inclusion of physical attacks. Bullying is non-physical assault, not battery.

WBI commissioned Zogby to conduct our 2014 U.S. Workplace Bullying Survey with a sample of all adult Americans that included unemployed workers (since bullying displaces so many of its targets). The prevalence of bullying was 27%. Our findings apply to all adult Americans, a broader sample.

The two studies are worth comparing. Both investigated bullying by race and rank.

Here are the major findings from the Career Builder survey (reprint of the CB press release).

• Minorities, the physically disabled and LGBT workers were bullied at a higher prevalence rate

• Women were targeted more than men (same for WBI)

• Managers were bullied at a 27% rate (it was 35% in the WBI 2007 national survey)

• Bullies were bosses (45%) and coworkers (46%); the WBI rates were 56% and 33%, respectively

• 48% of targets confronted their bully (WBI found that 69% had) and 45% of those people were successful at stopping the bullying (WBI found a paltry 3.57% success rate)

• 32% reported incidents to HR but in 58% of those cases nothing was done

According to the survey, the top five tactics were:

• Falsely accused of mistakes he/she didn’t make (43%)
• Comments were ignored, dismissed or not acknowledged (41%)
• A different set of standards or policies was used for the worker (37%)
• Gossip was spread about the worker (34%)
• Constantly criticized by the boss or co-workers (32%)

Regardless of the definition, this study reinforces our own work — workplace bullying is an American workplace scourge.

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Posted in Bullying-Related Research, Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), Social/Mgmt/Epid Sciences, Workplace Bullying Laws | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Workplace Bullying Parody: Consumable Resource Institute

Saturday, June 14th, 2014

Here is some work by a former target that lampoons the idea that “Human Resources” should change to a “Consumable resources” model. It would at least be more honest.

This is a great display of how time and creativity can help you work past a bullying experience.

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Posted in Broadcasts: Video, TV, radio, webinars | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



HR tutorial on handling Depression at work

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

New from your friends in the legal-averse HR industry: a webinar for HR folks on how to avoid granting (un)paid leave or making federal law mandated accommodations for people with mental disabilities called depression.

Session title: “Depression in the Workplace”

A rational person would think the session would be led by a psychologist, but nooo, it’s an attorney from the Eyres Law Group. Of course, if you or I non-attorneys professed to opine on subjects delving into the application of laws, we would be accused of an illegal act. But attorneys believe mental health and psychology are something not requiring any training or specialization.

The webinar topic list is upsetting, given what we know about the trauma that workplace bullying causes. And the fact that 49% of bullied individuals suffer clinical depression for the first time in their lives at the hands of an abuser at work!

Look at these webinar goals:

• How to tell if a depressed employee is “disabled” under the ADA’s mental impairment definition (WBI: the only thing worse than attorneys playing psychologist is HR doing the same. Yikes!)

• Whether depression is generally a “covered” disability if it’s the result of an underlying medical condition or due to an emotional trauma (WBI: which, of course, would never be caused BY the workplace)

• The medical inquires, limited examinations, and documentation you may legally request that the employee provide in support of a need for leave as accommodation (WBI: here’s where employers hire their own hack shrink who conducts an “independent” medical exam guaranteed to conclude that the problem is not real, these medical professionals rarely practice outside employer panels)

• How to respond to erratic attendance and persistent tardiness, including when to raise potential FMLA leave as an option (WBI: FMLA, in most cases is unpaid leave forcing workers to stay on the job against their physicians’ advice)

• How to successfully manage intermittent leave for chronic depression and curb potential FMLA abuse related to depressed workers (WBI: yes, abuse of unpaid leave is surely a chronic problem in the American laborforce that works more hours than workers in any other industrialized nation because there is no paid sick leave policies and leaves must be begged for. This smells like employer paranoia. Too bad employers don’t have to answer yet for real abuse, abuse of employees!)

• When you may legally discipline or terminate an employee with depression without sparking liability under federal disability and leave laws (WBI: Ah yes, the real agenda — how to fire the harmed employee.)

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Posted in Employers Gone Wild: Doing Bad Things, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Executive Decisions with Tim Muma

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

Check out this great 2-part interview for the program Executive Decisions. Host Tim Muma talks with Dr. Namie about bullying tactics and how to stop workplace bullying from costing your business money.

Listen to more Executive Decisions at localjobnetwork.com.

Part 1

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Part 2

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Posted in Tutorials About Bullying, WBI in the News | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Employer Resource Council: 20 Subtle Signs of Workplace Bullying

Sunday, November 10th, 2013

This week’s bullying situation in the NFL in which a player resigned because of bullying by a teammate, should remind employers to consider whether bullying by coworkers or bosses is affecting their employees and their ability to retain quality talent.

HR Insights Blog, ERC (yourERC.com), Nov. 5, 2013

If you think workplace bullying doesn’t affect some of your employees, you’re mistaken. One in four employees is affected by it. There is a misconception that bullying is overt. Rather, it’s often subtle, slow, and insidious mistreatment that passes over the radar screen.

Rarely can bullying be identified based on one action, but rather a pattern of actions over a long period of time. This is why it so often goes undetected in the workplace, and your employees could be suffering because of it.

Bullying Defined

The Workplace Bullying Institute defines bullying as “repeated, health-harming mistreatment of one or more persons (the targets) by one or more perpetrators that takes one or more of the following forms: verbal abuse, offensive conduct/behaviors (including nonverbal) which are threatening, humiliating, or intimidating; or work interference – sabotage – which prevents work from getting done.”

The primary issue with bullying is that the perpetrator desires to control the other person’s behavior, usually for his or her own needs, personal agenda, or self-serving motives. Bullies use a variety of subtle and sometimes not-so-subtle ways to control others emotionally, psychologically, and even physically.

Adept bullies and manipulators are often extremely controlling people who are attuned to certain personality traits to exploit others. They are skilled “people readers” and make it their task to understand someone’s flaws to determine what techniques can be used against them. Some even go a step further and mask their bullying behind a charming and nice demeanor and even a noble cause.

(more…)

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Posted in Media About Bullying, NFL: Jonathan Martin, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education, WBI in the News | 5 Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Metropolitan Corporate Counsel: The Case For Getting Aggressive With Workplace Bullies

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

By Kelly Ann Bird & Lindsay J. Jarusiewicz, The Metropolitan Corporate Counsel, August 21, 2013



Every parent is familiar with the word "bullying." It has now also become an important employee relations issue for businesses. Though there is no current federal or state law explicitly prohibiting workplace bullying, many states are considering legislation that would make bullying conduct illegal and create remedies for aggrieved employees. But even without workplace anti-bullying legislation, there is good reason for employers to address bullying concerns in the workplace. First, if unchecked, employees may assert claims related to bullying by sweeping the conduct into allegations of violations under existing laws. Second, the conduct is prevalent and persistent and, as such, clearly impacts the workplace.

(more…)
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Posted in Healthy Workplace Bill (U.S. campaign), WBI Education, WBI in the News, Workplace Bullying Laws | 1 Archived Comment | Post A Comment () »



No employer-provided health insurance? Wait until 2015 (maybe)

Friday, July 5th, 2013

Valerie Jarrett, an adviser to Pres. Obama, was the one to announce that employers will have an extra year to not provide employees with health insurance if they do not now. The White House chose to make the announcement the day before July 4 on Jarrett’s blog. The headline read: “We’re Listening to Businesses about the Health Care Law.” Too bad they don’t listen to workers without insurance whose immediate health problems require medical attention! But in America, as in no other major industrialized nation, without insurance people don’t have affordable access to doctors, clinics or hospitals.

Jarrett wrote:

“As we implement this law, we have and will continue to make changes as needed. In our ongoing discussions with businesses we have heard that you need the time to get this right,” she said in a post on the White House blog. “We are listening.”

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation 2012 Survey of Employers: 94% of employers with 50-199 employees provide some sort of health insurance (albeit with high deductibles and premium sharing); 98% of employers with over 200 employees make insurance available. Then, why the delay? Implementation of the law (passed back in 2010) will affect only employers with 50 or more employees.

SHRM, the HR trade association sure was happy, telling their members:

HR professionals across the country are celebrating today, not just in anticipation for Independence Day, but because of the U.S. Treasury Department’s announcement of a one year delay in implementing the employer mandate in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Thought you’d want to know who has the ear of the President.

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Posted in Commentary by G. Namie, Fairness & Social Justice Denied | No Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



Internal complaint systems attack those who dare tell truths

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

Bullied targets often wait a long time to complain about their plight. Delays happen when they are not quite certain what freight train hit them. They ruminate too long about why they unjustly were targeted? How could someone be so cruel? Eventually, they want to tell their employer.

Chain-of-command reporting requirements are common. Got a problem? Tell your supervisor. But when your supervisor is the bully, the requirement is a dangerous trap. It turns out to be equally ineffective when the bully’s boss is asked to make the bullying stop. [See the 2012 WBI Strategies Effectiveness study about the futility of confronting the bully directly or telling the bully's boss.]

People erroneously believe workplace bullying is an HR-level problem. Not so. It is more about leadership or the lack thereof. [See what understanding by a leader looks like.] Expecting HR to resolve bullying by holding a manager-bully accountable is a rare event. HR is there to defend the interests of management. They are not a neutral party in disputes. Retaliation is the most frequent consequence of following internal procedures for righting a wrong.

The larger point is that internal systems put the institution in the tripartite role of abuse by agents of the employer, then they are investigators, and finally they are judges and adjudicators. How can this turn out well for those subjected to harm by that same system? Internal investigators grant credibility to managers, while non-supervisory workers are considered malingerers, malcontents, disgruntled and mendacious. Senior managers consider workers who report that the best connected friends of those senior managers have done bad things to be the problem. The reporting is considered the problem — not the unconscionable actions that the complainant felt had to be reported.

And so we see the model repeated by several government institutions: the NSA, the CIA-FBI, the Dept. of Defense. Truth tellers (whistleblowers) and truth-telling victims are hunted like criminals, dehumanized, discounted, ignored, tormented, terminated, discharged from service, or imprisoned all to discourage others from showing the same kind of courage.

(more…)

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Posted in Commentary by G. Namie, Fairness & Social Justice Denied, Media About Bullying, Print: News, Blogs, Magazines, The New America, Tutorials About Bullying, WBI Education | 3 Archived Comments | Post A Comment () »



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